Category Archives: Student Skill Development

Seeing is Believing

This semester, I have 4 teaching assistants—two for my American Government and Politics class and two for my Introduction to Public Policy class. As the classes have progressed, I’ve noticed my teaching assistants making interesting discoveries about teaching. Continue reading Seeing is Believing

To Sum It All Up

Mathematics Senior Lecturer, Theresa Adsit, shares thoughts on her CATL Teaching Enhancement Grant funded project…

Having enjoyed the benefits of having randomized, computer generated homework problems available to assign to my Calculus and Intermediate Algebra students, I wanted to extend those same benefits to my Elementary Functions: Algebra and Trigonometry Math 104 students.  Continue reading To Sum It All Up

Why Should I Care About Theory?

Prior to teaching my Public Policy Analysis students the practical skills needed to produce good policy analyses, I would spend time grounding practice in classic theories of policymaking. Every semester, about half-way into these discussions, I would wish I hadn’t even bothered. Continue reading Why Should I Care About Theory?

The Power of What We Can Do

P. H. D.

Three little letters. On their own, they don’t look all that impressive. Once you learn a little about their significance, though, you find that those three little letters mean a great deal. A Ph.D. is the highest academic degree. As such, it takes years of intensive study to earn one. With an introduction like that, you might get the impression that I wrote this blog post to brag about the prestige of a Ph.D. That’s not at all what this is about, as you’ll see below. Continue reading The Power of What We Can Do

You Don’t Know How To Read

“You don’t know how to read,” I’ve fantasized about saying to my students. Then, I realize that they would quite rightly be offended. Of course my students are literate: some of them are even very skilled readers. However, many of them lose this skill when reading theoretical or philosophical arguments. Beyond tried and true methods of insuring that reading “compliance” occurs (quizzes, online quizzes, literature circles,discussion…), I wanted to know how to help my students learn to read like a political theorist. Continue reading You Don’t Know How To Read