Category Archives: Face-to-Face

Seeing is Believing

This semester, I have 4 teaching assistants—two for my American Government and Politics class and two for my Introduction to Public Policy class. As the classes have progressed, I’ve noticed my teaching assistants making interesting discoveries about teaching. Continue reading Seeing is Believing

To Sum It All Up

Mathematics Senior Lecturer, Theresa Adsit, shares thoughts on her CATL Teaching Enhancement Grant funded project…

Having enjoyed the benefits of having randomized, computer generated homework problems available to assign to my Calculus and Intermediate Algebra students, I wanted to extend those same benefits to my Elementary Functions: Algebra and Trigonometry Math 104 students.  Continue reading To Sum It All Up

Why Should I Care About Theory?

Prior to teaching my Public Policy Analysis students the practical skills needed to produce good policy analyses, I would spend time grounding practice in classic theories of policymaking. Every semester, about half-way into these discussions, I would wish I hadn’t even bothered. Continue reading Why Should I Care About Theory?

You Don’t Know How To Read

“You don’t know how to read,” I’ve fantasized about saying to my students. Then, I realize that they would quite rightly be offended. Of course my students are literate: some of them are even very skilled readers. However, many of them lose this skill when reading theoretical or philosophical arguments. Beyond tried and true methods of insuring that reading “compliance” occurs (quizzes, online quizzes, literature circles,discussion…), I wanted to know how to help my students learn to read like a political theorist. Continue reading You Don’t Know How To Read

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Before I became a professor, I utilized PowerPoint a great deal in my professional life. In fact, I prided myself in my ability to use the software and create dynamic presentations that interested whatever audience to whom I was speaking. In fact, when I first became a professor at UWGB, I felt as though my ability to use PowerPoint would be a strength to my teaching career. Boy, was I wrong! Continue reading Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Myth of the Gender Neutral Classroom

Many of my female faculty colleagues probably experienced being addressed as Mrs. or Ms. at least once every semester and not just by incoming freshmen. Or they read comments about shoes in their end-of-semester evaluations. But are those isolated incidents or does gender matter in how students perceive the knowledge and expertise of an instructor? Do they see differences in pedagogies? Types of course work that male and female faculty assign? Do students find female instructors more relatable? Do they themselves behave differently in the classrooms of male and female instructors? Last academic year, I finally got a chance to collect data on several of these research questions as part of our Teaching Scholars Program. Continue reading Myth of the Gender Neutral Classroom

Innovative Strategies For General Education

I was given the opportunity to attend and participate in the Baccalaureate Program Directors (BPD) Conference in Louisville, KY in March 2014 under the auspices of a teaching enhancement grant.  My goal was to learn innovative strategies that could be implemented in the general education course I teach (American Social Welfare, soon to be called Foundation of Social Policy) both in the face-to-face offering and in the development of an on-line version of the course to be taught in summer.  Continue reading Innovative Strategies For General Education

How hard is advising?

When I was first starting out as a professor students would ask me questions I just found ridiculous. Like, did they need to take a particular art history course. I thought, geez, take what the catalogue tells you to take! I didn’t always comprehend that a major or minor could have options, there could be confusion, and that the students themselves maybe didn’t know who else to ask those questions of. No, I thought, as the professor, their questions for me should be strictly limited to class content! Everything else was, “See your advisor.” And the advisor was never going to be me. Continue reading How hard is advising?