Category Archives: CATL Stuff

Innovative Teaching & Cirque du Soleil

The Annual Conference for the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL) was held in Quebec City last month. I had the privilege during this conference to hear a plenary from Bernard Petiot who is the Vice-President for Casting and Performance for Cirque du Soleil. He spoke on the environment that welcomes creativity at Cirque du Soleil and Continue reading Innovative Teaching & Cirque du Soleil

The Power of What We Can Do

P. H. D.

Three little letters. On their own, they don’t look all that impressive. Once you learn a little about their significance, though, you find that those three little letters mean a great deal. A Ph.D. is the highest academic degree. As such, it takes years of intensive study to earn one. With an introduction like that, you might get the impression that I wrote this blog post to brag about the prestige of a Ph.D. That’s not at all what this is about, as you’ll see below. Continue reading The Power of What We Can Do

Myth of the Gender Neutral Classroom

Many of my female faculty colleagues probably experienced being addressed as Mrs. or Ms. at least once every semester and not just by incoming freshmen. Or they read comments about shoes in their end-of-semester evaluations. But are those isolated incidents or does gender matter in how students perceive the knowledge and expertise of an instructor? Do they see differences in pedagogies? Types of course work that male and female faculty assign? Do students find female instructors more relatable? Do they themselves behave differently in the classrooms of male and female instructors? Last academic year, I finally got a chance to collect data on several of these research questions as part of our Teaching Scholars Program. Continue reading Myth of the Gender Neutral Classroom

Finding the right fit: integrating URSCA

Recently I had the opportunity to attend a Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) Workshop on integrating undergraduate research into faculty workload and tenure and promotion guidelines.  You may wonder, why would the Director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning be interested in this topic?  Continue reading Finding the right fit: integrating URSCA

Why I Care

As a 2014 CATL faculty consultant I have spent a number of hours concerned with facilitating the development of our colleagues during their early years on campus. Those of us who have been at it for a while recognize the importance of mentoring our nouveau faculty. But in addition, I value the importance of faculty revitalization, as we all recognize that the intense 24/7 demands and politics of academic life have the potential for burnout. Continue reading Why I Care

What do we Need to Know?

Last Fall the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning welcomed a new director. Professor Jennifer Lanter hit the ground running and quickly commissioned a faculty survey to assess the perception of the Center and to identify future areas of growth. The survey received a very healthy turnout with over 40 faculty responding from a broad range of academic units. Continue reading What do we Need to Know?

The Freshman Five

Over 25 staff, faculty and students met recently to talk about the Rebekah Nathan’s ethnographical book My Freshman Year, the CATL Book Club selection for Spring 2014. With discussions led by Professor Denise Bartell of the GPS program, participants talked about Nathan’s insights into the Freshman experience. While the discussion and the reading led to many considerations, here are were my top takeaways! Continue reading The Freshman Five

Don’t be the 71%

By the time you are standing in front of a classroom of students, ready to teach for the first time, you have probably spent at least 20 years on the other side of the lectern. You have sat through years of wonderful, inspired teaching, and probably an equal amount of less than exhilarating lectures. You have taken hundreds of tests, submitted literally tons of homework and skipped months of classes. You stand there with the benefit of an ‘Apprenticeship of Observation’[1] having become an expert in teaching through exposure.

Did you feel as prepared the first time you taught an online class?

Continue reading Don’t be the 71%

The History of CATL

In 2008 the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL) was officially formed. CATL was established in response to a recommendation made by the Task Force on Teaching Evaluation in fall 1998, a Faculty Development Council proposal submitted to the Academic Affairs Team in spring 1999, the recommendation of the Comprehensive Academic Program Review Task Force in fall 2006, and the receipt of initial funding to support the Center through the UW-Green Bay Growth Initiative.  Continue reading The History of CATL